Roof A-frame exposed!

I’ve been rattling on about the barns roof trusses / A-frame a fair bit recently, both on the forum and the roof post in my Anatomy of… series.

Well here’s quite a nice photograph of the real thing…

20120312-211845.jpg

For reference, the photograph shows the right hand side of the two furthest trusses that you can see on the ‘before’ photograph contained in the Anatomy of… post linked to above.

The anatomy of a roof

Laying bare the basics of my roof structure through an annotated diagram that a layman like me can better understand, the aim of this post is to answer the question…what are the component parts of a roof?

Based on the roof of my barn, a pretty simple A-frame / truss structure as (badly) pictured below, my anatomy of a roof diagram follows.

From Before
The anatomy of a roof
The anatomy of a roof

Or view in 3D:

The diagram shows a basic A-frame roof, with angled rafters, a single tie-beam for each pair of principal rafters and horizontal purlins.

You can also download the anatomy of a roof Google Sketchup model. All angles and measurements are for purely illustrative purposes.

This is a purely amateur effort, so please let me know of any additions or corrections that you think I should make.

Read more about the anatomy of posts on Mybarnconversion.com here.

This is one in a series of posts about the anatomy of various parts of barns & buildings in general.

Building Progress ~ May 2011

Update on building progress during May 2011…

Oh dear, a little late with my update – been on holiday, now can I remember what I did in May…?

The newly laid lawn is coming on green and lush, with a few bald patches and some unsightly lumps and bumps – but all-in-all looking pretty good.

Pointing is pretty much done – no official announcement as yet but near as damn-it done, just three years after starting…

…and then there’s filling in the eaves. I spent a weekend boarding up the back, then one on the front, then another on pointing the gap between the wall and the boarding – read more about it on this post. Just need to repaint them and fit mesh over the ends that I’ve left open to allow some airflow.

I must have spent the best part of a cumulative day bashing my way through the wall getting the TV aerial cable from outside to in. I still finding it amazing how long even the simplest seeming jobs can take. At least it’s there now.

Also made a start on painting the second bedroom – it feels strange starting work again inside – especially when the sun is shining.

Eaves

One of my last major tasks during this phase of work on the barn is to box in the gap under the eaves. The eaves had been left open and were a haven to birds, who had nested in the roof, being able to easily hop in an out through the ‘porch’ formed by the open eaves.

From Barn Conversion 2011

I’ve used plywood to seal across the eaves, each length of ply being screwed up onto the existing weather board and small blocks of wood that I placed at the end of each length of plywood, these having been first secured in place with long screws driven in from the front of the weather board.

With the plywood painted and the gap back-filled with expanding foam (the stains of which have lived on my hands for weeks) I’ve then pointed the gap between the wall and the plywood with my usual mix of lime mortar.

The final job, (not yet done) will be the fill the odd gaps that I’ve had to leave – where the plywood changes levels for example, with a black sealant and the ends of the eaves with a metal mesh to allow some air flow.

I expect the mortar to shrink in places as it dries out over the summer, I’ll then either repoint or fill with a sealant, whichever seems most appropriate.

Welsh Slate

I have a very small amount of slate roofing to do and I was very pleased to come across a website that contains some great data-sheets on how to go about roofing with slates >>

Welsh Slate.com
StoneWorks Ltd

In their own words: “Welsh//Slate based in North Wales is the worlds leading manufacturer of high quality roofing slate, architectural and aggregate slate products. Welsh//Slate roofing products have an unparalleled reputation for durability and quality.”

The link will take you to the sites Design & Installation (Technical) page from where you can find plenty of related and well laid out data-sheets.

Informative and Welsh… what more could you want?