Green Deal slow beginnings?

Oh dear! The green deal hasn’t got off to a very auspicious start…

As reported in the Telegraph today since it was launched nearly a year ago just 12 homes have taken advantage of the Green Deal with a few hundred more in the pipeline.

71,210 households had been assessed for Green Deal measures such as solar panels and insulation at the end of August … But only 677 households have gone to the next stage and said they would like to proceed with the scheme. Of these, 12 houses have had measures installed, while 293 properties had quotes accepted on work and 372 properties had installations “pending”.

It was always easy to predict that it may well have been so.

Energy policy, smoke screens, fracking, confusion and big bucks

There seems to be only one thing that is certain in the world of energy policy and that is that costs will rise annually above and beyond anything that inflation can currently throw at us. Beyond that, smoke screens & confusion seem to reign. Take the recent news for example…

It’s reported today that the governments current favoured gas powered path to the future will actually cost us more than greener alternatives. According to the Guardian reporting today on findings of the Committee on Climate Change (one of the governments own advisory bodies) “Household energy bills will be about £600 higher per year in the coming decades if the UK relies increasingly on gas“. This in comparison to “bills would only be £100 higher than today’s average dual fuel bill of about £1,300, if the country concentrated on renewable power generation, such as wind power.“. Hhmmmm, something doesn’t add up.

What makes us think that gas can sustain us into the future? Well that brings us to fracking. Fracking is currently an emotive subject, with a recent governmental green light to allow further exploration following a couple of earth-quakes caused by its exploratory application in the north of England, what exactly does it mean? Well it relates to the technique of liberating flammable gases from inshore rock using water pumped under high pressure. The Department for the Environment and Climate Change website has some interesting further reading for the interested. In short, we’re not sure how much gas fracking may yield, so to base an energy policy on it is somewhat hopeful.

Seems to me energy self-sufficiency is the only path we have to any kind of individual certainty.

What is SAP?

What is SAP and what are SAP calculations?

What is SAP and what are SAP calculations?

SAP 2005 (Standard Assessment Procedure for The Energy Rating of Dwellings) is the approved tool for the calculation of the energy performance of buildings.

SAP is the Government’s Standard Assessment Procedure for Energy Rating of Dwellings. SAP 2005 is adopted by government as part of the UK national methodology for calculation of the energy performance of buildings. It is used to demonstrate compliance with building regulations for dwellings – Part L (England and Wales), Section 6 (Scotland) and Part F (Northern Ireland) – and to provide energy ratings for dwellings.

from http://projects.bre.co.uk/sap2005/

It is important to note the link to Part L (Conservation of fuel and power) of building regulations. The SAP rating of a building is an indication of its compliance with building reg’s & its performance in relation to conserving fuel and power. You’ll require a SAP rating as a one of the inputs to the Energy Performance Certificate that you’ll need as a part of the completion sign-off of your building before you can sell or let the property.

A SAP rating is a number between 1 to 100 and the higher the score, the more energy efficient the property. The rating gives an indication of the likely running costs for space and water heating and the environmental impact of the property. The rating is adjusted by the size of the property to allow comparison of buildings with dissimilar floor areas.

Formulation of the rating is based on assessment of relevant criteria such as insulation, heating systems, ventilation, solar gain and the fuel used for space and water heating.