De-assembled, re-assembled, re-cycled barns

“A bit like a private sector, modernising, repurposing St Fagan’s…”

There’s an interesting article on Remodelista about an American company that uses the reassembled frames of barns as the basis of modern dwellings. A bit like a private sector, modernising, repurposing St Fagan’s (the museum of Welsh life just outside Cardiff where historic buildings are reassembled from their original site).

I’m not sure what the heritage sector would make of this, but when applied to buildings that would otherwise be lost, I can’t see any drawbacks.

Vital Statistics

One of the problems with the way that this site has evolved is that I’ve missed some of the fundamental blocks upon which a site like this would normally be built. One of the most obvious of those is that I’ve never really described the barn and the conversion that we’re undertaking.

An email I received a few weeks back (and subsequently lost due to my over zealous spam filter) pointed this out to me and so I’ve attempted to address the gap and update the About page with some further details. It’s been enjoyable and refreshing, reviewing the work and the progress we’ve made over the last four (how many??? time flies) years…

Following on from my original about text I’ve written a high-level description of the conversion, then some vital statistics and finally some before, during and after photographs…


The Conversion
The roof and walls have been structurally untouched by the conversion, although a number of incursions into them have been made. All original openings have been retained with three windows added to the southerly gable end & six roof-lights to allow natural light into the otherwise unlit first floor. The ‘arrow’ / ventilation slits have been glazed. The existing roof kept, albeit with the addition of in-roof vents toward the bottom edge to provide appropriate air-flow. On three sides, the walls have been completely repointed with lime mortar, the fourth side, the southerly facing gable-end has been limewashed.

The floor was dug out and replaced with a new one containing insulation, a radon barrier damp proof course and under-floor heating.

Originally the barn was in two distinct parts. A full height main area, with large through cart doors and a smaller two storied north-end with stables below and a hay-loft above. Ground and first floor openings have been cut through the internal wall to unify the two parts of the building.


Read the rest here >> About the barn

Chandelier

As I’ve already mentioned I bought a chandelier from Scavengers. It looked great on the web:

chandelier
My Chandelier

Not too fancy (if that can be said of any chandelier and I think I’m having second thoughts on that one), classy (well I thought it was when I bought it) and in pretty good condition. When it arrived, well packaged but obviously traumatised from a boisterous journey that condition had somewhat deteriorated.

Now the crystals have mainly come off their fixings and I’d sure the metal body of the chandelier has a slight twist in it (that wasn’t there on the original photograph).

I’ve ordered some additional parts – a couple of brass chains, some of the small bow shaped metal clasps that are used fix the crystals in place and a brass hook for attaching the whole thing to the ceiling.

I’ll have to see if my craft skills, I’ll being getting the brasso out soon, are up to reassembling the parts to make a chandelier worthy of hanging in quite a prominent place in the galleried part of the barn.

I’ll post again once it’s up and lit.