What is SAP?

What is SAP and what are SAP calculations?

What is SAP and what are SAP calculations?

SAP 2005 (Standard Assessment Procedure for The Energy Rating of Dwellings) is the approved tool for the calculation of the energy performance of buildings.

SAP is the Government’s Standard Assessment Procedure for Energy Rating of Dwellings. SAP 2005 is adopted by government as part of the UK national methodology for calculation of the energy performance of buildings. It is used to demonstrate compliance with building regulations for dwellings – Part L (England and Wales), Section 6 (Scotland) and Part F (Northern Ireland) – and to provide energy ratings for dwellings.

from http://projects.bre.co.uk/sap2005/

It is important to note the link to Part L (Conservation of fuel and power) of building regulations. The SAP rating of a building is an indication of its compliance with building reg’s & its performance in relation to conserving fuel and power. You’ll require a SAP rating as a one of the inputs to the Energy Performance Certificate that you’ll need as a part of the completion sign-off of your building before you can sell or let the property.

A SAP rating is a number between 1 to 100 and the higher the score, the more energy efficient the property. The rating gives an indication of the likely running costs for space and water heating and the environmental impact of the property. The rating is adjusted by the size of the property to allow comparison of buildings with dissimilar floor areas.

Formulation of the rating is based on assessment of relevant criteria such as insulation, heating systems, ventilation, solar gain and the fuel used for space and water heating.

Lessons learnt the hard way – squeaky floorboards

Having spent a few hours cutting out tongues (from floorboards nothing more sinister), lifting boards, rummaging around underneath them, padding and separating copper pipes with insulation, rescrewing and renailing, I discovered that in fact the easiest way to quieten down squeaky floorboards was to simply rehammer the heads of the nails that hold the boards in place. The boards had worked slightly lose over the last 30 years and a tap or two tightens them up by the half a millimetre or so needed to put them back into place.

The anatomy of a floor

Laying bare the basics of my floor structure through an annotated diagram that a layman like me can better understand, the aim of this post is to answer the question…what are the component parts of a floor?

The diagram is based on the floor of the barn to the best of my recollection (it’s been a few years since the floor was put in). There’s a fair amount of leeway in terms of the order from bottom to top that the various components of the floor go into it. But the parts – hardcore, topped with a sand blinding, insulation & a damp proof membrane then the concrete slab and a final flooring finish are pretty standard.



The anatomy of a floor

Or view in 3D:

The diagram shows a basic floor structure with embedded damp-proofing and insulation. In certain parts of the UK (as at the barn), you’ll also need to ensure that the damp-proof membrane is also a radon barrier.

You can also download the anatomy of a floor Google Sketchup model. All angles and measurements are for purely illustrative purposes.

As should be blisteringly obvious, this is a purely amateur effort, so please let me know of any additions or corrections that you think I should make.

This is one in a series of posts about the anatomy of various parts of barns & buildings in general.

Sketchup

I’ve been dabbling with Google Sketchup recently. Sketchup is according to the blurb “3D sketching software for the conceptual phases of design” or as rather more grandly proclaimed by McCall & Associates “SketchUp is the finest (and most innovative) tool available for anyone designing anything from coffee pots to skyscrapers.”

I’ve wanted to produce a series of ‘anatomy of…’ posts detailing the components and terminology related to the various parts of a building for some time now. I really wanted the series to be driven by diagrams rather than words – this is one of those subjects where a picture really is worth a thousand words. It didn’t take much searching to happen upon Sketchup as perhaps the best option for me to use.

So far I’ve created a couple of models and uploaded them to my new Sketchup library. Please take a look.

With the aid of Google SketchUp 8 For Dummies I spent a couple of head-scratching evenings trying to get Sketchup to do something close to what I wanted it to do. To me, the key to Sketchup as so many things in life is keeping things simple (KISS). Its all about edges and faces. Draw an edge (basically a line but in three dimensions), form a shape using other edges and Sketchup will fill the space between the edges with a face… repeat until you’ve built a model of the Taj Mahal, the Leaning Tower of Pisa, or in my case a labelled picture of a section of roof! There are all sorts of other whistles-and-bells, but those are the basics.

Quite enjoyable and a powerful tool for building any models you may have a hankering after. Give it a try… I quite fancy building a complete model of the barn – another one for the to-do list.

The anatomy of a roof

Laying bare the basics of my roof structure through an annotated diagram that a layman like me can better understand, the aim of this post is to answer the question…what are the component parts of a roof?

Based on the roof of my barn, a pretty simple A-frame / truss structure as (badly) pictured below, my anatomy of a roof diagram follows.

From Before
The anatomy of a roof
The anatomy of a roof

Or view in 3D:

The diagram shows a basic A-frame roof, with angled rafters, a single tie-beam for each pair of principal rafters and horizontal purlins.

You can also download the anatomy of a roof Google Sketchup model. All angles and measurements are for purely illustrative purposes.

This is a purely amateur effort, so please let me know of any additions or corrections that you think I should make.

Read more about the anatomy of posts on Mybarnconversion.com here.

This is one in a series of posts about the anatomy of various parts of barns & buildings in general.