Barns Gallery on Remodelista

There is a lovely gallery of barn related inspirational photographs available on Remodelista.


For all would be convertors and barn enthusiasts, there is a lovely gallery of barn related inspirational photographs available on Remodelista. There are lots of sliding barn doors (that I really fancy constructing at the barn) and there is an American bent to the content. But there is plenty of inspiration that could be applied wherever in the world you are.

remodelista.com

http://remodelista.com

Remodelista, “the sourcebook for considered living” – barns gallery.

Barns – the Long House

Situated on the North Norfolk coast, this is a building to admire…

After my recent complaints about the Balancing Barn, specifically the mismatched blend of Dutch design and the Suffolk countryside, I came across Alain de Botton and Living Architecture’s latest development, the Long House.

Situated on the North Norfolk coast, this is a building to admire, incorporating a modern reinterpretation of medieval barn roofs with references to the local vernacular through the enclosing giant flint walls and extensive timber work.

This quotation from the Observer suggests great success in the architectural design:

“Insulated from the elements yet somehow part of the landscape. Which is perhaps the best experience a holiday house can offer.”

Now that is more like it…

Barns – the Balancing Barn

A stunning piece of architecture, although not entirely to my taste…

For some reason I’d remembered the name of this architecturally impressive holiday-barn in Suffolk as the ‘hanging barn’, which makes it sound more like the title of a rural horror film than the first of Living Architecture’s holiday homes available to rent in the UK.

The aim of Living Architecture is to promote world-class modern architecture in rural Britain. Alain de Botton, writer (author of ‘The Architecture of Happiness’ amongst others), philosopher, television presenter and entrepreneur, is one of the co-founders.

Living Architecture

http://www.living-architecture.co.uk

In their own words: Clad in elegant silver tiles, the house dramatically cantilevers over the landscape, providing views from its huge panoramic windows over woods, ponds and meadows.

The Balancing Barn was designed by the Dutch architects MVRDV with interior design by the Dutch studio Makkink & Bey. “We wanted to showcase the best of Dutch design, so that there was an overall Dutch feel to the house”,says de Botton in an interview for homesandproperty.co.uk. That article also contains much more detail about and photographs of the barn.

A stunning piece of architecture, although not entirely to my taste and I find the barn an odd conundrum. An admirable project with a noble goal – an architecturally outstanding modern home that is both eye-opening and accessible to all able to pay for a stay, BUT why build a showcase of Dutch design in the Suffolk countryside?… I just don’t get that. Suffolk design, English or even British design I understand, but Dutch?

New fast-track planning permission for the development of barns proposed

The Daily Mail reports on a new fast-track route through planning controls for the conversion of barns…

In an article today (which I won’t link to as it has horrible pop-up windows when you land there), the Daily Mail reports that a new fast-track route through planning controls for the conversion of barns is being proposed. The proposals, under changes to the Use Class Order, cover conversion into shops, cafes and other types of non-residential venues (the Mail uses rock music venues as a example, not sure there’s a massive demand for those). Consultation on these changes runs until the 11th September 2012.

Such a loosening of controls is seen by Greg Clark, Planning Minister as a way to boost the rural economy, making it easier to develop new businesses and create new jobs.

Planning fees will also be increased by 15%, to allow more staffing in planning departments and therefore (theoretically?) faster throughput for applications… which is nice.

Personally, loosening up planning controls always makes me nervous and makes me ask why? If there’s a really good reason for a development then would this really make it more likely to happen?

De-assembled, re-assembled, re-cycled barns

“A bit like a private sector, modernising, repurposing St Fagan’s…”

There’s an interesting article on Remodelista about an American company that uses the reassembled frames of barns as the basis of modern dwellings. A bit like a private sector, modernising, repurposing St Fagan’s (the museum of Welsh life just outside Cardiff where historic buildings are reassembled from their original site).

I’m not sure what the heritage sector would make of this, but when applied to buildings that would otherwise be lost, I can’t see any drawbacks.